how to create .8x? files?

Developer
Jan 5, 2011 at 9:07 PM

I don't know how to create a valid .8xp file, or an .8xv or whatever. Could somebody please explain what the file header information is all about? I already saw it has the name of the program in it, but there is something which I guess to be some checksum-like thing in the first few bytes of every .8x? file, which I don't know how I could create it. Everything I know about it is that it's needed for TIconnect, which uses it for checking whether the file is valid or not...

Coordinator
Jan 5, 2011 at 9:42 PM

Hello,

The tiDE API has all of this functionality done for you, at least for .8xp, .8xk, and .8xu, with the ability to read from .8xi.  Use tiDE.API.Utility.DataConverter, which has static methods for tons of calculator file related functions.  It isn't as well commented as it could be, but to make .8xp files, use tiDE.API.Utility.DataConverter.Save8xp(bool Protected, byte[] Data, string ProgName, string File).  Protected determines if it will show in the EDIT menu (generally, true for TI-Basic, false for asm).  Data is the raw data to save to the file.  ProgName is the name that shows up in the PRGM menu (up to 8 characters, all uppercase.  It will force it to be uppercase and truncate after 8 characters).  Finally, File is the name of the file to save to.  Check out the source code if you are interesting in seeing how it works.

Developer
Jan 5, 2011 at 9:44 PM
Edited Jan 5, 2011 at 9:45 PM

thanks for the quick reply! I'll take a look!

Did you already try my (de-)tokenizer? What do you think about it? how should I implement it? (see other thread for reaction ;) )

Developer
Jan 8, 2011 at 1:13 PM

Creating .8x files is really easy, 8xk and 8xu I'm not sure, but .8xp is really easy.

 

Download a Hexadecimal code viewer and examine the Hexadecimal code very well. To make Assemblex I had to make lots of research on them and did it this way :D

Coordinator
Jan 8, 2011 at 4:15 PM

First of all, Visual Studio and Sharp Develop both come with built-in hex editors.  Second of all, like I said earlier, the tiDE API contains implementation for all of them.

Developer
Jan 8, 2011 at 7:46 PM
SirCmpwn wrote:

First of all, Visual Studio and Sharp Develop both come with built-in hex editors.  Second of all, like I said earlier, the tiDE API contains implementation for all of them.

Really? didn't know about the built-in hex editor. 

Coordinator
Jan 10, 2011 at 6:52 PM

I forget how to do it with SharpDevelop, but in Visual Studio, you can right click a file and hit "Open With" and choose the binary editor.  It's quite useful.